Hello Guest

Author Topic: Basics of Composition  (Read 5403 times)

Offline theqca

  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 2221
    • Framed For Life
Basics of Composition
« on: April 25, 2014, 12:35:15 AM »
Basics of Composition



Feel free to add your own tips or photographs which can be shared as examples for this post.

I?ve noticed I?ve shot a lot of photos which I look at and think ? nice pic?would have been a great pic but something is missing. This ?missing? bit very often is a compositional error which results in the image looking good?but not great.

I?m the sort of person who?s interested in results rather than getting into technical discussions so I?m not going to get into things like ?why do photos which adhere to these rules look better than photos that don?t?.

Trust me, in most cases, photos which follow these rules will look better than ones which don?t.

There always is an exception to the rule, however the rules will hold true for most of the photos you would usually take.

There also are some rules on how to break the rules ? will cover these in the next session.

   Keep the horizon off-centre
   Keep the subject off centre





Learn the rule of the thirds.






Leading lines ? The human eye tends to move along the lines in a photograph. Learn to identify these lines and use them in your photos to enhance the composition. These lines could be formed by roads, objects, etc.




   Contrasting colours









« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 04:13:09 PM by theqca »
Nikon FM(black), Nikon FG, Nikon D700, Nikon FM(silver), Nikon FM10, Pentax Spotmatic, Zenith TTL, Minox Wetzlar, Agfa Optima III, Yashica & Rollei rangefinders etc

28mm 2.8, 70-300vr, 200mm f4, 50mm 1.4, 55mm 2.8 macro, 50mm 1.8, 16mm 2.8, 70-210 f4 macro, Lensbaby, Helios 44 f2, 90mm macro, etc

Offline somnath goswami

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 1155
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2014, 10:15:21 AM »
Very fine and concise note Ayaz. Congratulations bro , you surely have the aptitude to write these instructive pieces.

regards

Somnath

Offline PixelHunter

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 797
  • Learning something new everyday..
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2014, 12:44:48 PM »
Brilliant write up as usual Ayaz. May I add the following-
Don't clutter an image by having too many elements
Having too many elements or points of interest in an image will confuse  the viewer. Its better to have a single or two strong element(s) that draws the viewer's attention rather than a number of element fighting for the viewers attention

Keep the camera straight This is not exactly a compositional advice, but in general keeping the camera perfectly straight oftens makes the final image look better. A slightly crooked horizon or subject never looks good.

Look at the corners of the viewfinder This happens the most while we are starting out. We carefully compose our image but ignore the corners. As a result there is often a twig or building or human element in the corners that spoil the whole image. So while composing,  also be careful what is in the extreme edges or corners of the frame.

Foreground, Mid ground and Background This applies specifically to Landscapes. Generally the landscapes look better if they have a foreground,  mid ground and background. The anchore point preferably should be placed by following the rule of thirds in any one of these three places. It can be anything like a tree, a rock , the sun etc.

Aspect Ratio We should compose our image keeping in mind the aspect ration that we are using. A composition that is working beautifully in a 4:3 aspect ratio may not look good in a square composition.
"The best camera is the one that's with you" Chase Jarvis

Offline Jasii

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 3203
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2014, 12:51:06 PM »
Great bit of write up Ayaz ji and Binoy ji those were valid updates as well.

A Q here ( I hope I am allowed to ask Q's here?

If one is shooting a landscape with a FG and BG say the sky, the mountains and green fields, where does one focus? The BG's are the objects of interest but are more or less at infinity. 
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
Gear: Canon 600d + 18-55, +55-250

Offline theqca

  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 2221
    • Framed For Life
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2014, 01:50:39 PM »


A Q here ( I hope I am allowed to ask Q's here?

If one is shooting a landscape with a FG and BG say the sky, the mountains and green fields, where does one focus? The BG's are the objects of interest but are more or less at infinity.

What aperture are you shooting this landscape at?
Nikon FM(black), Nikon FG, Nikon D700, Nikon FM(silver), Nikon FM10, Pentax Spotmatic, Zenith TTL, Minox Wetzlar, Agfa Optima III, Yashica & Rollei rangefinders etc

28mm 2.8, 70-300vr, 200mm f4, 50mm 1.4, 55mm 2.8 macro, 50mm 1.8, 16mm 2.8, 70-210 f4 macro, Lensbaby, Helios 44 f2, 90mm macro, etc

Offline Jasii

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 3203
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2014, 02:09:38 PM »


A Q here ( I hope I am allowed to ask Q's here?

If one is shooting a landscape with a FG and BG say the sky, the mountains and green fields, where does one focus? The BG's are the objects of interest but are more or less at infinity.

What aperture are you shooting this landscape at?

Well! you taught me to shoot at > F8 more like F11!  :)
It is not DOF that I am after, It is a generic Q in case of Landscape where BG is at infinity where does one focus? how to apply the 1/3rd rule here?
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
Gear: Canon 600d + 18-55, +55-250

Offline theqca

  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 2221
    • Framed For Life
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2014, 02:53:44 PM »
U should focus at a point that's a little bit lower than the half way mark

Unless if the story in ur landscape shot is not about the "landscape" but about foreground object - in that case focus on the foreground object.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 06:32:47 PM by Ayaz »
Nikon FM(black), Nikon FG, Nikon D700, Nikon FM(silver), Nikon FM10, Pentax Spotmatic, Zenith TTL, Minox Wetzlar, Agfa Optima III, Yashica & Rollei rangefinders etc

28mm 2.8, 70-300vr, 200mm f4, 50mm 1.4, 55mm 2.8 macro, 50mm 1.8, 16mm 2.8, 70-210 f4 macro, Lensbaby, Helios 44 f2, 90mm macro, etc

Offline Jasii

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 3203
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2014, 04:37:58 PM »
point me to a tutorial on this please......
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
Gear: Canon 600d + 18-55, +55-250

Offline saiki

  • Trusted Member
  • Manic
  • *
  • Posts: 473
  • From Canon camp
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2014, 04:46:03 PM »
Excellent Ayazbhai..... waiting 4 the rule breaking session.... :)
Which of my photographs is my favorite? The one I?m going to take tomorrow. ? Imogen Cunningham

Offline theqca

  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 2221
    • Framed For Life
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2014, 06:32:06 PM »
@Jasii - I dont have a link handy but just to explain what i mean - you need to focus a little bit below the centre of the image...

Nikon FM(black), Nikon FG, Nikon D700, Nikon FM(silver), Nikon FM10, Pentax Spotmatic, Zenith TTL, Minox Wetzlar, Agfa Optima III, Yashica & Rollei rangefinders etc

28mm 2.8, 70-300vr, 200mm f4, 50mm 1.4, 55mm 2.8 macro, 50mm 1.8, 16mm 2.8, 70-210 f4 macro, Lensbaby, Helios 44 f2, 90mm macro, etc

Offline Jasii

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 3203
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2014, 11:43:08 PM »
 :like:
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
Gear: Canon 600d + 18-55, +55-250

Offline sehgalatul

  • Rookie
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • You only live Once
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2014, 07:35:44 AM »
 Dear All,
               I loved reading this piece and i am smiling  smiling smiling....Jassi Sir You Know why. Anyways my Interest lies in the fact that supposedly there is nothing intresting at the point little below the midline where focus has to be done...Do we still focus there and assuming i have anchor right in my foreground that i want in sharp focus...My question is how to get all elements sharp....Any Answers?. :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Offline LightWave

  • Administrator
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 908
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2014, 08:34:41 AM »
If there is a Foreground object that is subject of the picture, then by all means focus on that as mentioned above. For the more generic landscape, where you want maximum possible area to come sharp, you stop down to F8 or F11 and focus where Ayaz mentioned. The DOF will ensure that most of the objects in your picture are sharp. Focussing at infinity by comparison leaves forground more blurred than one would desire. To discuss this in depth you have to read up about DOF and Hyperfocal distance. The effects of the aperture, distance of point focussed on from you and focal length of the lens on the DOF are very important basics that should be learned.

Offline somnath goswami

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 1155
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2014, 09:45:28 AM »
A bit of study of '' hyperfocal distance'' may be of help. But to get the '' entire ''  frame of a landscape in acceptable focus for a reasonably big print, I have seen many to employ focus stacking with success. I, personally, am too lazy to go that way and for me it's small aperture and focusing just below the middle and prayers :-P
Cheers
Somnath

Offline Jasii

  • Trusted Member
  • Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 3203
Re: Basics of Composition
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2014, 11:50:15 AM »
Dear All,
               I loved reading this piece and i am smiling  smiling smiling....Jassi Sir You Know why. Anyways my Interest lies in the fact that supposedly there is nothing intresting at the point little below the midline where focus has to be done...Do we still focus there and assuming i have anchor right in my foreground that i want in sharp focus...My question is how to get all elements sharp....Any Answers?. :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Grrrr....... You pulling my leg here Doc?  ;)
A Year young with my DSLR and loving it.........
Gear: Canon 600d + 18-55, +55-250